Tag Archives: Google Display Network

Killer demand gen strategy, Part 3: Facebook advertising

If you’ve been keeping up with this series, you’ve got your audience defined and designed creative to match. You’ve constructed smart Google Display Network campaigns to get those users pouring into your funnel.

Now let’s talk some of the most powerful targeting capabilities of all.

In addition to advertising on the GDN, Facebook is a platform you must use to reach your target personas. Facebook’s audience targeting capabilities are among the most effective you can access.

You can target interests, behaviors and a variety of demographic information to get in front of your ideal audience.

Explore Facebook’s targeting options

Think about the personas you have created and begin choosing the audience targeting available within Facebook that will help engage those users. For example, let’s say you’re selling luxury home décor. One of your personas is female, between the ages of 30-40, likes home décor, and is affluent. You would then pick targeting as relevant as possible to get in front of these users.

One example would be:

Additionally, you can layer further information onto your personas – for example, some of them might like celebrity gossip. Leverage Facebook’s audience narrowing and layer it on to test how it impacts performance. See below:

Killer demand gen strategy, Part 3: Facebook advertising

In addition to leveraging Facebook’s native audience targeting capabilities, consider leveraging 3rd-party data audiences from companies like Axciom or Datalogix.

These companies can provide you with rich data that can be highly relevant to your personas – and help you develop new ones.

Take advantage of Lookalikes

Lookalike targeting is another great way to identify the right types of audiences and leverage Facebook’s thousands of data points to get in front of them.

First, look at your customer list and identify different ways you can segment those customers into groups of identifiable characteristics. For example, you can segment out your highest-LTV audiences, different categories (e.g. furniture categories, high-AOV purchasers, etc.).

Then upload these customer lists into Facebook, which will leverage its algorithm to serve your ads to audiences that mimic your seed lists in characteristics, behaviors, and traits.

A reminder: use tailored creative to these audiences. If you’re serving ads to lookalike audiences of your high-AOV purchasers, show creative with more high-end products to match their purchase behavior.

Another great way to get in front of relevant users is to leverage lookalikes as a base audience and then add in persona layers. For example, you may think about having an LAL of 5% and layering on celebrity gossip as a narrowing layer.

This makes your base audience similar in characteristics and traits to your customers, and it allows you to refine the audience to more closely match some of the personas you have built out.

Additionally, when creating your audiences, keep an eye on size. You will almost always want to leverage Facebook’s oCPM (Optimized CPM) tool, which requires an audience size of at least 400K to reach people, collect conversion data, and optimize towards users who are likely to convert.

As you know, a lead gen marketer’s work is only beginning when the leads are captured; there’s a long and winding road from lead to conversion, which will require a whole new series to address. But the above strategies should ensure that you’re working from a healthy foundation of leads.

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Killer demand gen strategy, Part 3: Facebook advertising

If you’ve been keeping up with this series, you’ve got your audience defined and designed creative to match. You’ve constructed smart Google Display Network campaigns to get those users pouring into your funnel.

Now let’s talk some of the most powerful targeting capabilities of all.

In addition to advertising on the GDN, Facebook is a platform you must use to reach your target personas. Facebook’s audience targeting capabilities are among the most effective you can access.

You can target interests, behaviors and a variety of demographic information to get in front of your ideal audience.

Explore Facebook’s targeting options

Think about the personas you have created and begin choosing the audience targeting available within Facebook that will help engage those users. For example, let’s say you’re selling luxury home décor. One of your personas is female, between the ages of 30-40, likes home décor, and is affluent. You would then pick targeting as relevant as possible to get in front of these users.

One example would be:

Additionally, you can layer further information onto your personas – for example, some of them might like celebrity gossip. Leverage Facebook’s audience narrowing and layer it on to test how it impacts performance. See below:

Killer demand gen strategy, Part 3: Facebook advertising

In addition to leveraging Facebook’s native audience targeting capabilities, consider leveraging 3rd-party data audiences from companies like Axciom or Datalogix.

These companies can provide you with rich data that can be highly relevant to your personas – and help you develop new ones.

Take advantage of Lookalikes

Lookalike targeting is another great way to identify the right types of audiences and leverage Facebook’s thousands of data points to get in front of them.

First, look at your customer list and identify different ways you can segment those customers into groups of identifiable characteristics. For example, you can segment out your highest-LTV audiences, different categories (e.g. furniture categories, high-AOV purchasers, etc.).

Then upload these customer lists into Facebook, which will leverage its algorithm to serve your ads to audiences that mimic your seed lists in characteristics, behaviors, and traits.

A reminder: use tailored creative to these audiences. If you’re serving ads to lookalike audiences of your high-AOV purchasers, show creative with more high-end products to match their purchase behavior.

Another great way to get in front of relevant users is to leverage lookalikes as a base audience and then add in persona layers. For example, you may think about having an LAL of 5% and layering on celebrity gossip as a narrowing layer.

This makes your base audience similar in characteristics and traits to your customers, and it allows you to refine the audience to more closely match some of the personas you have built out.

Additionally, when creating your audiences, keep an eye on size. You will almost always want to leverage Facebook’s oCPM (Optimized CPM) tool, which requires an audience size of at least 400K to reach people, collect conversion data, and optimize towards users who are likely to convert.

As you know, a lead gen marketer’s work is only beginning when the leads are captured; there’s a long and winding road from lead to conversion, which will require a whole new series to address. But the above strategies should ensure that you’re working from a healthy foundation of leads.

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Killer demand gen strategy, Part 2: Google Display Network targeting

This is Part 2 of my blog series on crafting and executing killer demand gen strategies.

In Part 1, I discussed building out various personas to target, as well as how to craft the right creative. Now let’s chat through how to actually target these personas!

Both Google Display Network and Facebook have great audience targeting capabilities that allow you to get in front of your target audiences and the personas you have built out. Full disclosure: I was planning to wrap the GDN and Facebook together for this post, but both have so many features that they warrant their own edition.

So let’s dive into how to target your personas and audiences on the GDN, and save Facebook for Part 3.

Keyword contextual targeting (KCT)

Keyword contextual targeting is where you bid on keywords and Google will match you to pages relevant to your terms. You’ll notice two options when it comes to KCT:

  1. Content – shows ads on relevant webpages, etc.
  2. Audience – with this option, the ad will show on relevant pages and to people who might be interested in these keywords (so basically you are giving Google more control to do its thing).

My recommendation is to start off with Content, because you know exactly what you are getting into; don’t give Google control right away and make it hard to understand true performance. Content will have a lot less reach, but you have full visibility into things. As you begin seeing results, you can always adjust accordingly.

My general recommendation is to start off with your top 10-15 performing search terms – and then, of course, layer on demographic age and gender information so you are getting in front of the most relevant eyes.

Additionally, think about the personas you developed. In Part 1, I gave the example of a persona that loved celebrity fashion and gossip; building terms around those interests to get onto those pages is another way to get in front of the right eyes.

Custom Affinity Audiences

With Custom Affinity Audiences, you can input domains and Google will look at the types of users visiting those domains – makeup, demographics, topics of sites they visit, etc. Then Google crafts an audience similar to those users, which you can target.

Killer demand gen strategy, Part 2: Google Display Network targeting

With Custom Affinity Audiences, I recommend creating different audiences to target based off of:

  1. Competitor domains
  2. Industry-relevant websites
  3. Persona-relevant websites (think of the personas you have created and the types of websites they would visit)

In-Market Audiences

With In-Market Audiences, Google identifies people who are actively shopping for certain products and services. This is pretty clear-cut – choose In-Market Audiences relevant to your business.

Don’t forget to leverage the audience insights that Google gave you when developing your personas; those typically showcase other products/services that your core audience is typically in market for!

Killer demand gen strategy, Part 2: Google Display Network targeting

Refine your targeting to get closer to your target personas

For both KCT and In-Market Audiences, I recommend that you further refine your targeting by applying demographic layering onto those campaigns to get closer to your target personas. (With Custom Affinity Audiences, Google already incorporates demographic information from the data they pull as they analyze the audiences visiting the sites you enter.)

The above strategies are well worth testing out as you look to get in front of the right eyes and scale your business.

In part 3, we’ll dive into Facebook and how to best leverage its advanced targeting capabilities to get in front of your personas and target market!

Site category exclusions for Google Display Network getting brand safety update

The changes are related to updates first announced in March in response to an advertiser YouTube boycott.

The post Site category exclusions for Google Display Network getting brand safety update appeared first on Search Engine Land.



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Study: Q1 Google Display Network placements

Are you utilizing the Google Display Network in AdWords? Contributor Ted Ives shares some data on which site categories perform best.

The post Study: Q1 Google Display Network placements appeared first on Search Engine Land.



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PPC 101: 6 Tips to Supercharge Google Display Network Performance by @iambenwood

This post outlines 6 tips designed to help advertisers harness the potential of display advertising via the Google Display Network, including how to get the most from a limited budget.

The post PPC 101: 6 Tips to Supercharge Google Display Network Performance by @iambenwood appeared first on Search Engine Journal.

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Google Display Network to Begin Serving Ads With No Targeting As of January 18 by @MattGSouthern

Google recently announced changes to how it will be targeting ads starting on January 18, 2017.

The post Google Display Network to Begin Serving Ads With No Targeting As of January 18 by @MattGSouthern appeared first on Search Engine Journal.

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A 10-minute account audit to prevent SEM fires during the holidays

We’ve talked about it for weeks, and it’s truly upon us now: holiday crunch time.

Your eyes are probably crossing with all the prep and must-dos, but if you’re short on hours and would like to make sure to avert any ROI disasters before they happen, make sure to check these five items off your SEM list.

1) Pull a search query report over the last 60-90 days and optimize against it

We’re looking for two specific buckets here:

  • Terms that have spent a significant amount of budget and racked up no (or few) conversions and high CPAs. These are terms you would not want your ad to appear on. You will want to create a shared negative list in your shared library and apply it to all of your campaigns. Then add in any negative terms based on poor performance that you find in the search query report.
  • Terms that are converting and have great CPAs. You will want to ensure you are using exact match to bid on these terms; this will allow you to maximize your control over top performers and push more volume and scale.

2) Check your ad group setup and limit the number of keywords

Ad groups should be limited to 1-10 keywords with close-knit themes; this allows you to tailor your ad copy as much as possible to keep the ad relevant to what the user is searching for.

If there are too many keywords with varying tokens, look into breaking these out into additional ad groups. It should go without saying that if you get more granular with the keywords in your ad groups, you should also be able to tailor your bidding to good effect.

3) Run a placement report over the last 60-90 days and add negatives

If you’re running Google Display Network campaigns, the Placement Report is the GDN version of a search query report. Look for poor-performing placements that have a high number of clicks and plenty of cost – but no conversions.

Equally as important: look for placements that have high CPAs with low conversions. Add all of the placements that match those criteria to a negative placement shared list and apply that list to all of your GDN campaigns. You want to ensure your ads do not appear on these websites.

4) Do device analysis for search and display

If you’re running search and GDN campaigns, you’ll want to run device analyses for them both – and watch for different things.

For search, pull a device analysis on all campaigns to understand how mobile, tablet, and desktop perform. Develop bid modifiers at the campaign level to adjust bids according to performance (for example, if mobile CPAs tend to be 20% higher than desktop CPAs, you will want to apply a negative bid modifier to mobile devices to pay less for mobile CPCs).

For the GDN, keep in mind that 99% of the time, mobile on GDN doesn’t work. Take a quick peek at performance, and if this is borne out, make sure to add in a -100% mobile modifier to turn it off.

5) Check for basic campaign-level best practices

Just to be sure there’s nothing in your account that could cause a four-alarm fire, let’s cover some campaign-level basics. (If you need to fix any one of these, do it now!)

  • Search and the GDN should be separate campaigns. If you are running both within one campaign, build out another and make sure you have your settings for “Search Network Only” or “Display Network”. You want to have the most control over these targeting types as they perform VERY differently from one another.
  • Don’t settle for standard delivery for your best campaigns. Top performing campaigns should be set to “accelerated ad delivery” so you capitalize on as much high-converting traffic as you can.
  • Be smart about budget allocation. If you are budget capping, make sure you are allocating more budget to your top-performing campaigns so that they never run dry.

Now, will taking all of these steps make sure the 2016 holiday season is your best ever? Nope; they’re just scratching the tip of the optimization iceberg. But if you found yourself saying “Oh, I should do that,” to any of the above, make sure those items take top priority, otherwise you’re leaving yourself open to a big ROI leak when the traffic starts flooding in.

Good luck!

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Mobile paid search has increased by 134% since last year: stats

There has been an increase of 20% in the YoY growth of Google search ad spending in Q3 2016, while paid search mobile phone spend has increased by 134% from the past year.

This is according to Merkle’s Q3 Digital Marketing Report, which covers the latest trends in paid search, social media, display, and organic search.

Here are some more useful stats on all the changes that occurred in the past year.

Paid Search

  • Google search ad spending grew 20% YoY in Q3 2016, although it’s down from the 22% growth a quarter earlier. Click volume grew 28%, while CPCs fell 6%.

  • Google Shopping (PLA) spending grew 36% YoY on a 59% increase in clicks. Google text ad spending rose 9% on 11% higher clicks.
  • Bing Ads and Yahoo Gemini combined search ad spending fell 14% YoY in Q3 2016, compared to a 17% decline in Q2. Bing Product Ad spending declined 12%, while Gemini’s share of click volume across both platforms remained flat at 17%.
  • Total paid search phone spending increased 134% YoY, while both tablet and desktop spending fell 4%. Phones and tablets combined to generate 62% of Google search ad clicks, which is a 5% increase from Q2. Desktop CPCs rose 8% YoY in Q3 2016, while tablet CPCs were flat.

Mobile paid search has increased by 134% since last year: stats

Organic Search & Social

  • Total organic search visits fell 5% YoY in Q3 2016, although still an improvement from a 7% decline in Q2. Phone organic search visits increased 9% YoY, the first quarterly increase in 2016, while desktop visits fell 7% .

Mobile paid search has increased by 134% since last year: stats

  • Google organic search visits fell 1% YoY as the search engine’s efforts to increase the monetization of its mobile search results continues to depress organic volume. Yahoo organic visits fell 21% YoY, while Bing visits fell 2%.
  • Mobile devices produced 48% of organic search visits, up from 46% in Q2, but still below the 57% of paid search clicks that took place on mobile devices.

Mobile paid search has increased by 134% since last year: stats

  • Facebook dominated social visits, producing 61% of all site visits generated on social media sites in Q3 2016, which combined to produce 4% of mobile site visits. 

Mobile paid search has increased by 134% since last year: stats

Comparison Shopping Engines

  • The eBay Commerce Network’s share of total comparison shopping engine (CSE) spending continued to climb, reaching 65% in Q3 2016. Niche CSEs account for 6% of spending, while eBay’s main rival in this space, Connexity, has seen its share fall to 29%.

Mobile paid search has increased by 134% since last year: stats

  • Mobile devices produced just 16% of CSE clicks in Q3 2016, similar to the rate observed in Q2, but well below the over 60% rate for Google Shopping.

Display Advertising

  • Total display and paid social advertising spending rose 46% YoY in Q3 2016, with Facebook dominating with a 63% YoY increase. Facebook CPCs continued to decline YoY, although the average CPM rose 38%.

Mobile paid search has increased by 134% since last year: stats

  • The Google Display Network (GDN) accounted for 8% of advertisers’ total Google advertising investment, a small decline from a year earlier.
  • Facebook advertising spend was up 63% in YoY in Q3, which accounts for one of the highest rates of growth of the past years.

Mobile paid search has increased by 134% since last year: stats

For more information check out Merkle’s Q3 Digital Marketing Report.

Google brings store visits to Google Display Network, debuts cross-device retargeting

Google says that it can deliver 99 percent location accuracy at 200 million stores globally.

The post Google brings store visits to Google Display Network, debuts cross-device retargeting appeared first on Search Engine Land.



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