Tag Archives: emoji

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Five most interesting search marketing news stories of the week

Welcome to our weekly round-up of all the latest news and research from the world of search marketing and beyond.

This week, Google’s emoji conquest of the SERP is advancing on AdWords titles, Snapchat influencers may be fleeing the platform for greener pastures, and Facebook is making it easier for advertisers to compare the performance of their Facebook campaigns with their campaigns on other platforms.

Also, Google’s Next Cloud Conference has revealed that Google’s machine learning technology can recognize objects in videos, and an unconfirmed ranking update dubbed “Fred” has been shaking up the SERP over the past few days.

Emoji appear in Google AdWords ad titles

A couple of weeks ago, we reported on the official return of emoji to the Google SERP, after a decision was taken to remove them in 2015. Now, emoji have been spotted in the wild in AdWords ad titles, suggesting that a possible roll-out might be on the cards there too.

Clark Boyd reported on the development for Search Engine Watch this week, looking at where emoji have been identified in ads, and what this could mean for advertisers and marketers if it does become permanent.

As investors bet on Snap, some Snapchat influencers bet on other platforms

Last week, Snap, the parent company of Snapchat, went public to huge investor excitement, closing out the day with a $34 billion valuation, with shares valued at 44% above their offering price.

But as is so often the case with social media, the road for Snapchat hasn’t been completely smooth. Al Roberts reported on our sister site, ClickZ, that some Snapchat influencers are departing for other platforms after experiencing a rocky relationship with Snapchat.

One influencer, Mike Platco, was turned away when he attempted to visit Snap’s offices in 2014. Today, he has some 500,000 followers on Snap and reportedly earns as much as $80,000 for campaigns, but his relationship with Snap apparently hasn’t warmed much over the years. As a result, Platco is working to move his followers over to Instagram.

“Every single bad thing I could possibly say about Snapchat, I could say the opposite of how my relationship is going with Instagram,” he told BuzzFeed.

Roberts looked at the possible reasons for Snapchat’s decision not to roll out the red carpet for influencers, as well as whether this tactic may backfire if its user growth and revenue figures come as a disappointment to shareholders further down the line.

Facebook Advanced Measurement will let advertisers compare Facebook ad performance

This week, Facebook announced the launch of a new service known as ‘Advanced Measurement’, which will allow advertisers to compare the performance of their Facebook campaigns with their campaigns on other platforms.

According to Business Insider, Advanced Measurement will allow advertisers to compare their Facebook campaigns to the campaigns they are running through providers like Google AdWords and the Google Display Network.

Specifically, advertisers will be able to determine which campaigns on which platforms “drove the most purchases on their online store, or had the highest reach among their desired target audience.”

As Al Roberts wrote for ClickZ, by making advanced attribution tools like Advanced Measurement accessible to all of its customers, Facebook could help allay some of the growing concerns advertisers have about the accuracy of its metrics – providing that companies are still prepared to trust Facebook’s reporting.

Google’s machine learning technology can recognize objects in videos

Visual search could be the next big frontier in search development, as developments in artificial intelligence and machine learning make it possible to recognize, compare and analyze images with increasing accuracy.

Until now, it has seemed like Google has been lagging behind slightly in the race for visual search dominance, as other contenders like Pinterest and Bing forge ahead with advanced visual discovery tools and technology. But that may no longer be the case.

Five most interesting search marketing news stories of the week

Image: Google Cloud Platform

The Verge reported Wednesday on a revelation from Google’s Next Cloud Conference, which ends today, that a new “Video Intelligence API” developed by Google has the ability to identify objects in videos, understand the nature of those videos (e.g. a commercial), and can pull up videos with certain types of scenes in them, based on a keyword search.

The Video Intelligence API is currently in private beta, but should it become more widely available to the public, it would further expand the capabilities of visual search and recognition into the realm of video, in the same way that searching “sunset” in Google Photos can bring up your best shots of the early evening sky.

Unconfirmed Google ‘Fred’ update is shaking up search rankings

Another week, and another Google algorithm change has the search community abuzz with speculation about what could be going on.

The first signs that an update might be taking place came early on the morning of Wednesday 8th, and SEO Roundtable’s Barry Schwartz observed that most of the active conversation was centered around the Black Hat World and WebmasterWorld forums. Many users were reporting sharp drops in traffic and keyword rankings taking place late on Tuesday and early on Wednesday, although no-one was able to pin down an exact cause.

Over on Twitter, Google’s John Mueller was typically vague when asked to confirm whether an update was taking place:

However, an amusing conversation then spawned around naming the (suspected) update, which culminated in it being dubbed “Fred” after Gary Illyes declared that “From now on every update, unless otherwise stated, shall be called Fred”.

Have you experienced any ranking turbulence from Hurricane Fred? Do you have any theories as to what kind of sites Google might be targeting with the update? Leave a comment!

Google adds emoji & GIF suggestions, translations & more to GBoard for Android

The latest updates give Android users access to emoji and GIF suggestions as they type and the ability to share GIFs in supported apps. The post Google adds emoji & GIF suggestions, translations & more to GBoard for Android appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.
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Emoji appear in Google AdWords ads titles

Emoji have been spotted in the wild in Google AdWords ads titles, giving rise to speculation that this option may be rolled out globally for all advertisers soon.

We have seen this before, although prior instances of emoji in AdWords seemed to be caused by a loophole that allowed certain character combinations to pass through Google checks. As such, any gains to be made from using emoji were very short-term.

However, there is cause to believe that this time round, they could be here to stay.

The prime instance of emoji showing up recently in AdWords was last week, when the following ad title was spotted on Google.de for the query “autohaus mainz”:

Emoji appear in Google AdWords ads titles

Only a small number of ad titles including emoji have been observed so far, so this may just be a small test and could even be another loophole set to be closed soon by Google – although the latter seems unlikely.

It seems more probable that this is an indication of an upcoming change that could have significant implications for many industries.

We wrote a couple of weeks ago about Google’s decision to allow emoji in organic search listings again, hinting at a noteworthy change in stance on the use of this universal, visual language.

Emoji appear in Google AdWords ads titles

It is expected that there will be restrictions on their appearance for organic search queries and only truly relevant searches will return these characters in their results.

We tried this out with our article and, in line with what we have seen elsewhere, emoji are present within the title tag in search results:

Emoji appear in Google AdWords ads titles

Viewed in light of what we have seen over the last few years, with the ever growing presence of paid listings in search results to the cost of their organic counterparts, it is difficult to conceive that this new functionality will extend only as far as SEO. It seems only a matter of time before this applies equally to paid search, if it has a positive effect on CTR.

What impact could this have?

The aspect that will enthuse or discourage advertisers will, of course, be the impact on campaign performance. In theory, apt usage of emoji could increase CTR and, ultimately, Quality Score too, so this could be seen as very welcome news.

Should this be rolled out even to a small percentage of queries, it could provide a new avenue for attention-grabbing creative in an area that has lacked for invention when compared to, for example, Facebook.

Moreover, bearing in mind the new, less conspicuous ‘Ad’ label, launched with the rationale that Google wants to “streamline” the number of colours in search results, it would be contradictory to launch emoji across a large swathe of results so soon.

Although, a cynic may counter, perhaps that rationale is a rather convenient aegis under which to increase paid search CTR and, in turn, Google revenues. In that sense, the launch of emoji in ad titles would be entirely in keeping with Google’s business strategy.

Emoji appear in Google AdWords ads titles

How can advertisers use emoji in their AdWords titles?

Assuming that this will be rolled out beyond small, ring-fenced tests, advertisers will be able to copy and paste emoji into the ad text creation field within AdWords.

As such, this would only be a small change compared to launching any other campaign, and the more telling aspect of the upgrade will be within the targeting options deployed and the analysis of campaign performance.

Emoji appear in Google AdWords ads titles

How far could this trend go?

Google announced last year the ability to perform searches using emoji, we have seen their appearance within a small pool of shopping results within the last year, and there is even an option to view query-level performance for emoji in Search Console.

In the case of the latter, this capability of course depends on consumers having used emoji initially, so its applicability to search marketers so far is limited. Nonetheless, it is a direct reflection of Google’s aim to increase search query volume through new means in the face of a rapidly maturing competitive landscape.

Emoji appear in Google AdWords ads titles

Additionally, going back to our article on emoji in organic results, we did find some difficulties with social sharing buttons, which were clearly unable to process the characters as intended. So it is safe to surmise that the widespread adoption of emoji across all digital platforms is not solely dependent on Google’s position.

That said, with their AI-powered Assistant set to roll out on all Android phones, emoji usage will likely increase on Google devices, as will the search giant’s ownership of the data.

Emoji appear in Google AdWords ads titles

That sequence of events would no doubt strong-arm other tech platforms into upgrading their capabilities to keep up.

What does this mean today?

It would be prudent to wait for further confirmation that Google is allowing emoji in AdWords before experimenting with this; until that point, we can still assume that this is in violation of Google’s guidelines.

However, with the confirmed release of emoji in SEO listings, it seems entirely plausible that paid search will follow suit sometime soon. In the interim, it would be worth considering how best to make use of this across industries if and when the anticipated announcement does arrive.

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Google Upgrades Gboard for iPhone with Voice Typing, New Emoji, and More by @MattGSouthern

Gboard, Google's alternative mobile keyboard, has been updated on iPhone with support for voice typing, new emoji, and new languages.

The post Google Upgrades Gboard for iPhone with Voice Typing, New Emoji, and More by @MattGSouthern appeared first on Search Engine Journal.

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Six most interesting search marketing news stories of the week

Welcome to our weekly round-up of all the latest news and research from the world of search marketing and beyond.

This week, we’ve got a bumper crop of stories from the search and marketing industry, including the Chan-Zuckerberg Initiative’s acquisition of an AI-powered search engine, new ad-targeting features on YouTube, the most popular emoji on Instagram, and the news that mobile search and YouTube are leading growth in Alphabet’s fourth quarter earnings.

Also, you’ll never guess who one of Google’s most prolific advertisers is – it’s Google.

Chan-Zuckerberg Initiative acquires AI-powered search engine, Meta

The Chan-Zuckerberg Initiative, the $45 billion philanthropic organisation founded by Mark Zuckerberg and his wife Priscilla Chan, has made its first acquisition – of a search engine. Meta is an search tool which uses artificial intelligence to make connections between scientific research, making it easier for researchers to search through and link together more than 26 million scientific papers. The Chan-Zuckerberg Initiative intends to make Meta, which was previously partly subscription-based, free for everyone to use after spending a few months enhancing the product.

“But wait!” I hear you cry. “Didn’t Search Engine Watch already run a story recently about a scientific search engine powered by AI?”

You’re absolutely right, astute reader – as Adam Stetzer reported earlier this month, Semantic Scholar is an AI-powered search engine for scientific research which is already free to use. While there’s no reason why the world can’t have more than one AI-powered science search engine, it will be interesting to see how the two different projects interact over the coming months and years.

YouTube adds new ad-targeting features

One of the biggest weapons in Google’s advertising arsenal is the sheer amount of data that it is able to collect about users’ search and browsing histories, in order to better target ads in their direction. Last Friday, it was revealed that Google is bringing that scary amount of knowledge to bear on YouTube by allowing advertisers to target users based on their Google account activity.

A blog post on the Google Inside AdWords blog explained:

Now, information from activity associated with users’ Google accounts (such as demographic information and past searches) may be used to influence the ads those users see on YouTube. So, for example, if you’re a retailer, you could reach potential customers that have been searching for winter coat deals on Google and engage with them with your own winter clothing brand campaign at just the right moment.

Al Roberts reported on the news for ClickZ this week and examined why Facebook could be the driving force behind Google’s decision to give advertisers more flexibility in how they target users on YouTube.

Instagram is making Stories more appealing to brands

In August of last year, Instagram debuted Stories: a new feature on its social network devoted to posts which disappear after 24 hours, and a direct and unashamed copy of the Snapchat feature of the same name. Despite a bit of mockery at first, response to Stories has been positive, with 150 million users enjoying the feature daily – and some saying that Instagram Stories has all but replaced Snapchat for them.

Now, Instagram is bringing in some additions to make Stories a more appealing prospect for brands, with new Business Insights available to users with business profiles, and full-screen photo or video ads appearing in between Stories.

Ads will be initially tested with 30 clients around the world, including Capital One, Buick, Maybelline New York, Nike, Yoox, Netflix, and Qantas.

Six most interesting search marketing news stories of the week

These are 2016’s most popular emoji on Instagram

We’ve got a two-for-one special on Instagram stories this week, with a study by Quintly which has revealed exactly how and how often emoji have been used on Instagram.

Quintly analysed  20,000 Instagram profiles and 6.2 million posts during 2016 to observe how emojis have been used on the platform over the last year. Among its findings were the fact that 56% of Instagram profiles have used emoji so far, and there has been a 20% increase in their use during 2016 alone.

Also, the most popular emoji on Instagram is the camera Six most interesting search marketing news stories of the week – commonly used as a way of attributing photos, which might speak to the amount of pictures on Instagram which aren’t created by the accounts who uploaded them.

Six most interesting search marketing news stories of the week

 One of Google’s most prolific advertisers is… Google itself

Google is the single biggest recipient of digital ad spend, with its well-oiled ad machine generating tens of billions of dollars of revenue every year. Now, an analysis by the Wall Street Journal and SEMRush has revealed that “ads for products sold by Google and its sister companies appeared in the most prominent spot in 91% of 25,000 recent searches related to such items. In 43% of the searches, the top two ads both were for Google-related products.”

Al Roberts took a look at the study’s methodology and findings over on ClickZ, and considered what this means in terms of conflicts of interest from the internet’s biggest search engine.

Mobile search and YouTube lead Alphabet’s revenue growth

Yesterday, Google’s parent company Alphabet announced its fourth-quarter earnings for 2016. Quartz reported that Wall Street was expecting Alphabet to post revenue of around $25 billion, but it in fact exceeded this prediction with more than $26 billion in revenue, up 22% over the same quarter the previous year.

Six most interesting search marketing news stories of the week
Source: Atlas

In a press release, Alphabet CFO Ruth Porat said that the company’s “exceptional” growth was “led by mobile search and YouTube.” While this is interesting news for the search industry (especially ahead of Google’s mobile-first search index – coming soon to a search engine near you), the earnings report revealed that Alphabet’s non-search prospects haven’t been doing so well. Nearly 99% of Alphabet’s revenue came from Google, while its “Other Bets” – the other projects it is pursuing to diversify its revenue streams – posted a loss of roughly $1.1 billion.

Google is still finding ways to increase its revenue, and the company is by no means struggling to bring in the money. But thus far, its parent company hasn’t been too successful in shifting the focus away from the search and advertising it is best known for.

meta-1.png

Six most interesting search marketing news stories of the week

Welcome to our weekly round-up of all the latest news and research from the world of search marketing and beyond.

This week, we’ve got a bumper crop of stories from the search and marketing industry, including the Chan-Zuckerberg Initiative’s acquisition of an AI-powered search engine, new ad-targeting features on YouTube, the most popular emoji on Instagram, and the news that mobile search and YouTube are leading growth in Alphabet’s fourth quarter earnings.

Also, you’ll never guess who one of Google’s most prolific advertisers is – it’s Google.

Chan-Zuckerberg Initiative acquires AI-powered search engine, Meta

The Chan-Zuckerberg Initiative, the $45 billion philanthropic organisation founded by Mark Zuckerberg and his wife Priscilla Chan, has made its first acquisition – of a search engine. Meta is an search tool which uses artificial intelligence to make connections between scientific research, making it easier for researchers to search through and link together more than 26 million scientific papers. The Chan-Zuckerberg Initiative intends to make Meta, which was previously partly subscription-based, free for everyone to use after spending a few months enhancing the product.

“But wait!” I hear you cry. “Didn’t Search Engine Watch already run a story recently about a scientific search engine powered by AI?”

You’re absolutely right, astute reader – as Adam Stetzer reported earlier this month, Semantic Scholar is an AI-powered search engine for scientific research which is already free to use. While there’s no reason why the world can’t have more than one AI-powered science search engine, it will be interesting to see how the two different projects interact over the coming months and years.

YouTube adds new ad-targeting features

One of the biggest weapons in Google’s advertising arsenal is the sheer amount of data that it is able to collect about users’ search and browsing histories, in order to better target ads in their direction. Last Friday, it was revealed that Google is bringing that scary amount of knowledge to bear on YouTube by allowing advertisers to target users based on their Google account activity.

A blog post on the Google Inside AdWords blog explained:

Now, information from activity associated with users’ Google accounts (such as demographic information and past searches) may be used to influence the ads those users see on YouTube. So, for example, if you’re a retailer, you could reach potential customers that have been searching for winter coat deals on Google and engage with them with your own winter clothing brand campaign at just the right moment.

Al Roberts reported on the news for ClickZ this week and examined why Facebook could be the driving force behind Google’s decision to give advertisers more flexibility in how they target users on YouTube.

Instagram is making Stories more appealing to brands

In August of last year, Instagram debuted Stories: a new feature on its social network devoted to posts which disappear after 24 hours, and a direct and unashamed copy of the Snapchat feature of the same name. Despite a bit of mockery at first, response to Stories has been positive, with 150 million users enjoying the feature daily – and some saying that Instagram Stories has all but replaced Snapchat for them.

Now, Instagram is bringing in some additions to make Stories a more appealing prospect for brands, with new Business Insights available to users with business profiles, and full-screen photo or video ads appearing in between Stories.

Ads will be initially tested with 30 clients around the world, including Capital One, Buick, Maybelline New York, Nike, Yoox, Netflix, and Qantas.

Six most interesting search marketing news stories of the week

These are 2016’s most popular emoji on Instagram

We’ve got a two-for-one special on Instagram stories this week, with a study by Quintly which has revealed exactly how and how often emoji have been used on Instagram.

Quintly analysed  20,000 Instagram profiles and 6.2 million posts during 2016 to observe how emojis have been used on the platform over the last year. Among its findings were the fact that 56% of Instagram profiles have used emoji so far, and there has been a 20% increase in their use during 2016 alone.

Also, the most popular emoji on Instagram is the camera Six most interesting search marketing news stories of the week – commonly used as a way of attributing photos, which might speak to the amount of pictures on Instagram which aren’t created by the accounts who uploaded them.

Six most interesting search marketing news stories of the week

 One of Google’s most prolific advertisers is… Google itself

Google is the single biggest recipient of digital ad spend, with its well-oiled ad machine generating tens of billions of dollars of revenue every year. Now, an analysis by the Wall Street Journal and SEMRush has revealed that “ads for products sold by Google and its sister companies appeared in the most prominent spot in 91% of 25,000 recent searches related to such items. In 43% of the searches, the top two ads both were for Google-related products.”

Al Roberts took a look at the study’s methodology and findings over on ClickZ, and considered what this means in terms of conflicts of interest from the internet’s biggest search engine.

Mobile search and YouTube lead Alphabet’s revenue growth

Yesterday, Google’s parent company Alphabet announced its fourth-quarter earnings for 2016. Quartz reported that Wall Street was expecting Alphabet to post revenue of around $25 billion, but it in fact exceeded this prediction with more than $26 billion in revenue, up 22% over the same quarter the previous year.

Six most interesting search marketing news stories of the week
Source: Atlas

In a press release, Alphabet CFO Ruth Porat said that the company’s “exceptional” growth was “led by mobile search and YouTube.” While this is interesting news for the search industry (especially ahead of Google’s mobile-first search index – coming soon to a search engine near you), the earnings report revealed that Alphabet’s non-search prospects haven’t been doing so well. Nearly 99% of Alphabet’s revenue came from Google, while its “Other Bets” – the other projects it is pursuing to diversify its revenue streams – posted a loss of roughly $1.1 billion.

Google is still finding ways to increase its revenue, and the company is by no means struggling to bring in the money. But thus far, its parent company hasn’t been too successful in shifting the focus away from the search and advertising it is best known for.

Google Shopping Display URL Emoji Spotted

Search marketers try anything to get their search listings to stand out and one put an emoji Santa Claus in their Google Shopping display URL to stand out...
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Now You Can Search Google by Tweeting Emoji At It by @MattGSouthern

Among the number of languages Google understands, you can now add emoji to the list.

The post Now You Can Search Google by Tweeting Emoji At It by @MattGSouthern appeared first on Search Engine Journal.

The Rise of Emoji and Google’s Mobile-First Movement

We’re constantly tuned in to the Internet as well as the new technologies and amenities that spawn from it.

Emoji — those little smiley faces and symbols used in your mobile device’s messaging keyboard — used to be used exclusively for text messaging. Their meanings are simple. Unlike shorthand acronyms like LOL, emoji have the ability to convey universal messages, like laughter and joy.

Emoji are now integral in the digital vocabularies of people of all ages and backgrounds and are used not only between individuals, but by companies, too.

A Brief History

Before emoji were introduced in the U.S., they originated in Japan. Created by Shigetaka Kurita, who worked for the mobile communication company DoCoMo, Emoji were intended to be a means of communication through pictures that didn’t use much data. Meanwhile in the U.S., emoticons, pictorial representations created using punctuation marks, were more widely used, as few devices could recognize emoji.

The success of the emoji did not go unnoticed, and Apple launched an emoji keyboard in 2010. Soon after, emoji were standardized by Unicode, which allowed the images to be recognized on all devices.

Unlike emoticons, emoji faces are far more detailed and represent a wider range of emotions. Additionally, emoji keyboards include objects, like food, plants, flags, buildings, etc.. They are able to modify sentences and answer questions without text. In fact, in 2015, “emoji” was named the fastest growing language as well as named the Oxford Dictionaries Word of the Year.

It wasn’t long before corporations began hopping on the emoji bandwagon. With social media and email marketing, companies could use emoji to convey messages to their customers. Coca-Cola, one of the world’s most valuable and recognized brands, was one of the first companies to use emoji as an effective marketing tool when they launched the #ShareaCoke campaign on Twitter. To set a world record for “World’s Largest Cheers,” Coca-Cola used a branded emoji, exclusive to Twitter. When users would use #ShareaCoke, two clinking coke bottles would appear in the tweet automatically. This campaign actively engaged audiences worldwide, garnering the media’s attention. It is considered one of the best uses of emoji marketing to date.

Other forms of emoji marketing tactics include branded emoji, like Kim Kardashian’s “Kimoji” keyboard, Ikea’s keyboard, which includes a plate of Swedish meatballs speared with a Swedish flag, and even Domino’s emoji-order text service, which allows hungry customers to simply text the pizza emoji to open an order.

Emoji Domain Registration

Domain registration continues to be a hot market. It’s clear that some domain names are more effective than others, causing a lot of competition over certain domains.

Since the introduction of the emoji in the U.S., emoji are able to be registered in domain names, but the process is difficult. Through a method called punycoding, emoji are translated to text, allowing search engines to recognize the images as standard text and route a user to a web page.

Somewhat unsurprisingly, Coca-Cola was one of the first corporate giants to launch an emoji domain name.  

“One has to have a reasonably sophisticated knowledge of punycode and whatnot to even look to see whether domains are available,” according to GoDaddy, a domain registrar and web hosting company. “From there, the setup is a bit of a pain.”

That’s why GoDaddy has launched an emoji domain registration page on its own. https://❤❤❤.ws/ is the company’s official, chosen domain, which is translated to ASCII in the browser, because computers are only able to recognize numerical text.

“Driven by the rise of mobile Internet usage, which now accounts for over 60% of traffic, consumers are integrating emojis into their conversations on social media, messaging and beyond,” said Theresa McGinness Geraghty, the GoDaddy senior director of product marketing.

The Future of Digital Marketing

Years ago, the marketing departments in many companies made the shift to digital-first. We’ve seen the disintegration of a number of newspapers in lieu of online news sites, as well as the shift from mail coupons and deals to email-first. Now, as digital media consumption patterns among Internet users continues to evolve, more companies have put emphasis on mobile marketing tactics.

According to Nielson, 92% of consumers are more influenced by peer recommendations and word of mouth marketing — otherwise known as earned media — than all other forms of advertising. Consumers like conversational patterns, the study finds. Many potential buyers look for consumer reviews instead of checking out the most recent ad, or are more apt to search in-store to find out if a product is worth it. Emoji, which is primarily used in messaging format between friends, family, and colleagues, is highly conversational, which leads many to believe why it is so effective for marketers.

Google has even taken action to keep up with the shift. On Nov. 4, 2016, Google announced its plan to move forward with mobile-first indexing. Previously, the search engine giant would index desktop content. As users continue to search using a smartphone or tablet, they continuously run into sites ranked highly in the SERPs, but do not have nearly as much content as their desktop counterparts.

For some companies, this isn’t worrisome. Responsive websites allow the same robust content to be published across all media and will not count against the site’s Google rankings. Responsive sites are extremely important for SEO. For mobile sites that are more empty, this is a wake-up call to make the shift to mobile-first marketing, or else the rankings will plummet.

As mobile Internet usage continues to rise and an optimized mobile site is of much higher stakes than before, it’s a curious question to ask, how will emoji come into play?

Emoji are recognizable on desktop computers, but much harder to access. With the exception of Apple’s newest MacBook Pro, which has a touch pad in place of a function bar, keyboard shortcuts or click-in keyboards are needed to access emoji on a desktop or laptop computer.

Among a number of other uses, the new MacBook Pro touchpad is able to access an emoji keyboard which can be swiped and searched, much like it is on an iPhone. This method is highly user-friendly, especially for those familiar with emoji via mobile devices.

Though GoDaddy’s emoji domain registration is expected to be successful — many have already registered a number of emoji combinations, if only for the resale value — we still haven’t seen a huge amount of these domain names in the mainstream. Since most desktop keyboards do not support emoji typing, it’s far more difficult to search an emoji domain organically.

Emoji domains are fully Google-compatible, and have been for some time now. In May 2015, Google’s John Mueller said that they would be removed and hopefully filtered out of the titles of search results, as they started to look spammy.

“I thought that looked really cool when I saw the first pages that were using [emoji],” said Mueller, “But I think it’s really easy to over do that, so I think it’s something we’ll take action on it at some point.”

Eventually, Google did filter out the emoji titles. These sites were not penalized in their rankings, but it is interesting now, considering the probable hike in emoji domains, how the SERPs will look going forward. With a mobile-first index, it is likely that emoji URLs will appear higher in the SERPs than they would on desktop, but it’s too soon to tell whether Google will adjust the appearance of these results based on how they look.